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Behind the Texas Badge

Buy the book that tells the story of Texas law enforcement

Testimonials

I've only read about 10 stories so far and it's already had me laughing and crying. The stories from our great state's law enforcement officers are amazing and genuine. Love love this!

Ashley Acosta

I’ve had my copy for 2 days, and can barely put it down! Each officer’s story is written in a way that makes you feel as if you know him or her personally, and gives the reader an insight as to what a day in the life of these heroes is truly like! Amazing book!!!!

Jane Jones

Mine came in today...I'm still up at 10:30 reading. I may be through the book in less than a week at this rate. Great interviews with the K9's!

Kevin White

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Teddy M. Jones, Assistant Chief Deputy, Dallas County Sheriff

I use to love working Texas/OU Weekend crowd control in downtown Dallas back in the day when folks walked a loop up and down Commerce Street. Folks would lose all inhibitions and just try and out-yell the other team. All that came to an end after shots rang out and a young man died at Houston and Commerce in 1992. I performed CPR on that young man as thousands of screaming kids just kept driving and walking on by.

Donald Beard, Texas State Park Police

After an exhausting all night search for a troubled individual, I had to sit down with his parents and tell them that he was found deceased on top of a mesa in the park with a self-inflicted gunshot wound. I still think about that event today.

Sheriff Miguel Rodriguez, La Salle County

When I walk into a restaurant and little kids are misbehaving, the parents sometimes tell them if they don’t straighten up they’ll tell the cop to take them to jail. I tell parents, “Please don’t do that. It will make them afraid of us and not like us.”

the stories are the heart and soul of the project

Corporal Lance Crawford, Dallas Police Department

One of the craziest calls that comes to mind is fending off a black panther that had gotten loose from its owner's cage. It attacked my partner and then me. All I could do was strike it on the head with my flashlight. It ran off and was captured by the zoo.

Sergeant Jody Tillery, Rockdale Police Department

I responded to a call from the mother of a three-month-old baby at about 2:00 a.m. Over the radio, I could actually hear the mother screaming, “My baby’s not breathing!” I rushed over there, and as I went through the door, the mom was holding the little fella. He was just a little ol’ baby. He was limp, he wasn’t breathing, and he’d already turned blue. The first thing I did was say, “God, you’ve got to help this kid.” I took him from the mom, and I pressed on his back and didn’t get anything. I rolled him over and I held him in my arm and started doing CPR compressions for an infant. I’d do compressions for a little bit, and then I would kind of sit him up and give him a little air, then I’d do compressions again. I probably did that for, I don’t know, it felt like a lifetime, but it was probably a few minutes. All of a sudden, out of nowhere, it sounded like a grown man taking a big breath, and the baby put out a little cry. At that point in time, nothing else in the world existed. Everything was all good. I was actually just the instrument that God used to get it done. If that is the only thing I accomplish being a police officer—if that’s why I was put in Rockdale, Texas, to save that baby’s life, I’m fine with it.

Assistant Chief Christy Martinez, Grand Prairie Police Department

On September 15, 1999, when I was 16, a friend invited me to attend a youth concert at Wedgewood Baptist Church in Fort Worth. That was the night that Larry Gene Ashbrook entered the church and shot and killed seven people, injured another seven, then shot and killed himself. The first person to breach those doors to get us out was an off-duty Fort Worth police officer. It evidently impacted my life because he represented safety, security, and rescue. He got us out of that situation. The shooting had already ended, but the fact that he broke through those doors not knowing what to expect spoke volumes.

Doug and Carol Hutchison